Revealed

A blog about scientific and medical visualization and all that’s involved.

AMI Day 2–Morning

Posted by Janet on July 17, 2008

The second day was packed with lectures–three in the morning and three more until dinner time. Then we have an hour until an award banquet, which is the most formal occasion at the AMI as various award winners are announced.

Session 1
The day began with a talk by Afshad Mistri and Steve Sandy about the technology of visualizing sets of two dimensional CT or MRI data in three dimensions. The talk focused on Osirix and Fovia with an ongoing demo on large screen of cutting edge features or features specifically designed for medical illustrators. It was concluded with a fly-through of the colon, during which transparency were adjusted so the audience could see structures on the outside.

Session 2
The second talk by Keith Kasnot and Craig Foster featured the process of designing and fabricating the “Ace of Hearts” motorcycle, an anatomically correct heart-themed motorcycle made to be presented to Dr. Edward B. Diethrich, founder of the Arizona Heart Institute as a lifetime achievement award. Keith Kasnot and Craig Foster developed the concept, then worked with motorcycle designer Paul Yaffe over a period of two years to create a working motorcycle and to ensure anatomical accuracy in the details.


Beginning of the fabrication process


Painting the tank


Craig Foster (left) and Keith Kasnot (right) on “Ace of Hearts”


Detail of the tank as an anatomically correct heart (as accurate as constraints allowed)

For more details shots of this heart bike, see http://www.paulyaffeoriginals.com/pyo-projects-heartbike.htm

Session 3
Brad Holland, renowned advertising and editorial illustrator, spoke about the evolution of his style and personal growth as an illustrator. Brad Holland’s works have appeared in Playboy, the New York Times, Times, Avant Garde, The New Yorker, and many more. He is also the co-founder of the Illustrators Partnership of America.


Sketches by Brad Holland prior to his illustration career


One of the his earliest color illustrations, in his late-teens or early-twenties


After going to art school, Brad Holland steered away from realism and began the emergence of his style as we see today.

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